1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 17

LIVE (photo by: S.W. Purcell) PROCESSED - Commercially important sea cucumbers of the world

bet7/17
Sana02.07.2017
Hajmi0.67 Mb.

LIVE 

(photo by: S.W. Purcell)

PROCESSED 

(photo by: J. Akamine)

48


COMMON NAMES:


 Pinkfish (

FAO

), Trépang rose (

FAO

), Kadal Attai (India), Saâu gai (south 
Viet Nam), Red beauty, Red-black, Hotdog (Philippines), Pink lollyfish (Africa and Indian Ocean 
region), Abu sanduk tina (Eritrea), Stylo rouge (Madagascar), Cera (Indonesia), Loli kula (Tonga), 
Tenautonga (Kiribati), Dri-damu (Fiji).

DIAGNOSTIC  FEATURES:


  Dark  grey, 
chocolate  brown  or  black  dorsally,  fading 
laterally  to  pink  or  whitish  pink  ventrally. 
Ventral  surface  with  small  dark  spots.  A 
small  to  medium-sized,  sausage-shaped 
holothurian. Body subcylindrical. Tegument 
somewhat  rough  with  sparse  papillae  on 
dorsal surface. Ventral podia are short but stout, numerous and light coloured. Anus terminal and 
Cuvierian tubules absent. 

Ossicles:


 Tentacles with curved rods that have enlarged spiny extremities, 70–180 µm long. Dorsal 
and ventral body wall with similar tables and button-like rosettes. Tables with disc greatly reduced, 
on average 35 µm across, perforated by 1 central hole; spire ending in a Maltese cross. Button-like 
rosettes perforated by 4–10 uneven holes and with uneven rim, 30–70 µm long. Ventral podia with 
perforated plates, 100–140 µm long, and shorter rods. Dorsal podia with large rods that can have few 
perforations, 135 µm long on average.

Processed  appearance:


  Narrow  cylindrical  shape,  slightly  flattened  ventrally.  Dorsal  surface 
with small wrinkles, dark brown; ventral surface is smoother, light to medium brown. No cuts or 
small cut across mouth. Common dried size 10–14 cm.

Size:


 Maximum length 38 cm; commonly to about 24 cm. Average fresh weight 200 g; average fresh 
length 20 cm.

HABITAT AND BIOLOGY:


 
Found mostly on silty-sand or sand mixed with 
coral  rubble.  Occupies  semi-sheltered  reef 
habitats, namely reef flats and lagoon patch reefs 
near the coast from 0 to 20 m depth. Also found 
in  seagrass  beds  and  sometimes  on  hard  reef 
surfaces. 
Asexual  reproduction  by  fission  is  annual,  but 
the  sexual  reproduction  cycle  is  uncorrelated 
and appears continuous. In southern Viet Nam, 
transverse fission has been recorded in June at 
the beginning of the rainy season. On the Great 
Barrier  Reef,  this  species  reproduces  sexually 
between December and January.

Holothuria edulis 


Lesson, 1830

tables of body wall


plate of 


body wall


calcareous ring


rosette


rod of dorsal podia


plate of podia


rods of tentacles


(after Cherbonnier, 1980)

Aspidochirotida: Holothuriidae


49


EXPLOITATION:


Fisheries:


  It  is  harvested  in  artisanal 
fisheries  in  much  of  its  range  in  the 
Indo-Pacific.  Prior  to  a  moratorium, 
harvesting in Papua New Guinea involved 
hand  collection,  free  diving  and  use  of 
lead-bombs.  Minor  harvesting  in  New 
Caledonia  is  done  by  hand  by  gleaning 
on  reef  flats  at  low  tide  or  skin  diving  in 
shallow waters. In Viet Nam, this species is 
gathered using hookah diving. In Asia, this 
species is fished in China, Japan, Malaysia, 
Thailand,  Indonesia,  the  Philippines  and 
Viet Nam. In Indonesia and the Philippines, 
it  is  heavily  exploited.  This  species  is  of 
low  commercial  importance  in  Kenya 
and  Madagascar.  It  is  not  of  commercial 
importance in Seychelles, New Caledonia 
and Australia. It is sometimes collected for 
the aquarium trade. 

Regulations:


 In New Caledonia, there is 
a prohibition for the use of compressed air apparatus, fishers must be licensed and there are no-take 
reserves. Before a fishery moratorium in Papua New Guinea, fishing for this species was regulated by 
minimum landing size limits (25 cm live; 10 cm dry), a fishing season, a TAC, gear restrictions and 
permits for storage and export.

Human consumption:


 Mostly, the reconstituted body wall (bêche-de-mer) is consumed by Asians.

Main market and value:


 Asia. It is a low-value species. In Viet Nam, Ho Chi Minh City for further 
exports to Chinese markets. It has been traded at USD4–20 kg
-1
 dried in the Philippines.

GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION:


 
East  Africa,  Madagascar,  Red  Sea, 
southeast  Arabia,  Sri  Lanka,  Bay  of 
Bengal, East Indies, North Australia, the 
Philippines, China and southern Japan, 
South Sea Islands. In India, this species 
is  distributed  in  the  Gulf  of  Mannar 
and the Andamans. Widespread in the 
Pacific  and  Southeast Asia,  extending 
to  French  Polynesia  in  the  southeast 
and Hawaii in the northeast.

LIVE 

(photo by: S.W. Purcell)

PROCESSED 

(photo by: S.W. Purcell)

50


Holothuria flavomaculata 


Semper, 1868

COMMON NAMES:


 Red snakefish.

DIAGNOSTIC  FEATURES:


  Dark  grey, 
bluish-black,  brownish-red  to  black  over 
entire  body,  with  characteristic  pinkish, 
orangy  or  reddish  tips  to  the  numerous, 
large papillae over the body and yellowish 
tentacles. A  relatively  large,  elongated  sea 
cucumber.  Some  diagnostic  characters  in 
the  literature  are  conflicting.  Papillae  are 
numerous on the lateral margins and around 
the mouth. Podia are more numerous near the 
posterior end. Mouth is ventral, with 20 to 31 
greyish  or  yellowish  tentacles  with  lighter 
terminal  discs. Anus  is  terminal,  encircled 
with 5 groups of papillae. Cuvierian tubules 
absent.

Ossicles:


 Tentacles with straight or curved rods, 95–355 µm long. Dorsal and ventral body wall 
with similar tables and rods. Tables without disc, spire ending in a Maltese cross. Rods spiny and 
massive, 85–105 µm long. Podia with tables similar to those of the body wall and, in addition, rods 
with perforated extremities, 160–200 µm long, and perforated plates, 130–210 µm long.

Processed appearance:


 Similar to Holothuria coluber, dried H. flavomaculata are elongated and 
irregular in shape, and clearly tapered at the anterior end. Brown body covered with lighter-coloured 
bumps. Small cut across mouth and/or in the body middle. Common size probably about 20 cm.

Remarks:


 This  species  may  resemble  H.  coluber,  especially  in  the  Indian  Ocean,  and  has  been 
mistaken for that species in some reports.

Size: 


Maximum length 60 cm; average length 35 cm.

calcareous ring


(after Massin, 1999)

massive rods of body wall


perforated plates of podia


perforated rods of podia


tables of body wall


tables of podia


rods of tentacles



Aspidochirotida: Holothuriidae


51


HABITAT  AND  BIOLOGY:


  Generally 
inhabits  areas  with  mud,  sand  or  coral 
rubble. Lives in waters from 1 to 40 m deep. 
It can be found with its posterior end hidden 
under coral rocks or crevices, but also may 
feed  in  the  open.  Populations  generally  at 
low  density  and  often  few  individuals  are 
recorded at each locality.
Its reproductive biology is unknown.

EXPLOITATION:


Fisheries:


  In  the  western  central  Pacific,  this  species  is  commercially  harvested  in  Palau,  the 
Federated States of Micronesia, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu. It is probably also harvested artisanally 
in certain localities in the Indian Ocean and Southeast Asia.

Regulations:


 There are few regulations pertaining to the harvesting of this species.

Human consumption: 


Mostly, the reconstituted body wall (bêche-de-mer) is consumed by Asians.

Main market and value:


 This species is low value, similar to H. coluber. In Fiji, fishers occasionally 
collect it and sell it to processors for about USD2 kg
-1
 fresh gutted.

GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION: 


The Indian Ocean and western central 
Pacific.  Reported  from  Madagascar, 
Mascarene  Islands,  the  Red  Sea, 
Sri  Lanka,  Indonesia,  China,  the 
Philippines,  Australia,  Palau,  Guam, 
Micronesia (Federated States of), New 
Caledonia  to  French  Polynesia  and 
Clipperton Island.

LIVE 

(photo by: S.W. Purcell)

52


Holothuria fuscocinerea 


Jaeger, 1833

COMMON NAME:


 Labuyo (Philippines).

DIAGNOSTIC 


FEATURES:


 
This 
species is greyish-brown or greyish-green 
dorsally  and  beige  to  brown  ventrally.  It 
may have brown blotches dorsally. It is a 
medium-to-large (>20 cm long), cylindrical 
species  with  a  soft  tegument.  The  brown 
papillae on the dorsal surface are wide at 
the base and narrow tipped. The podia of 
the  ventral  surface  are  sparse  and  small, 
but these are more numerous at the lateral 
flanks  of  the  ventral  surface.  The  ventral 
mouth has 20 large tentacles. Anus is dorsal 
and  surrounded  by  a  dark  purple  ring.  It 
possesses very thick, numerous Cuvierian 
tubules, which are readily ejected.

Ossicles:


 Tentacles with curved rods, 50–400 µm long slightly rugose at extremites. Dorsal and 
ventral body wall with rather poorly developed tables and buttons. Table discs roundish and smooth, 
25–40 µm across, perforated by 4 central and few peripheral holes, low spire ending in an ill-formed 
crown.  Buttons,  25–40  µm  long,  smooth,  irregular,  with  1–3  pairs  of  holes.  Ventral  podia  with 
irregular perforated rods, up to 235 µm long, large perforated plates, 100–155 µm long, buttons up 
to 70 µm long, and tables with spire reduced to knobs on disc. Dorsal papillae with rods, up to 300 
µm long, perforated distally and some large tables with spire reduced to knobs.

Processed  appearance:


  Light  brown  in  colour. The  papillae  on  the  dorsal  surface  should  be 
evident as bumps in dried specimens.

Remarks: 


The distinction between this species and Holothuria pervicax is clear in life. While the 
former can be variable in appearance from light grey to banded with brown to dark brown, it never 
has pinkish bases to its papillae as H. pervicax, which is quite uniform in appearance. Moreover, only 
H. fuscocinerea has a dark brown ring about its anus and near the base of the ventral podia.

Size: 


Maximum length 30 cm; average length is about 20 cm.
(after Reyes-Leonardo, 1984)

buttons of body wall


tables of body wall


irregular buttons


table discs


rods of tentacles


supporting ossicles


(source: Solís-Marín et al., 2009)

Aspidochirotida: Holothuriidae


53


HABITAT  AND  BIOLOGY:


  Prefers 
habitats between 0 and 30 m depth. Found 
in lagoonal habitats, reef flats and on outer 
reef slopes of barrier reefs. In Kenya, it is a 
nocturnal species.
Its reproductive biology is unknown.

EXPLOITATION:


Fisheries:


  This  species  does  not  have  a 
commercial  value  in  the  western  central 
Pacific;  however,  it  is  of  commercial 
importance  in  China,  Malaysia  and  the 
Philippines. In China, it is of low commercial 
importance. It is exploited in a multispecies 
fishery in Sri Lanka.

Regulations:


  There  are  few  regulations 
pertaining to the harvesting of this species.

Human consumption: 


Not avalable.

Main  market  and  value:


  Probably  low 
value.  It  has  been  reported  to  have  been 
traded  at  up  to  USD3  kg
-1
  dried  in  the 
Philippines.

GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION: 


It can be found in the the Indian Ocean, 
Red  Sea,  western  central  Pacific  and 
Asia. Also  distributed  in  Celebes  and 
Amboina,  Sri  Lanka,  Bay  of  Bengal, 
East  Indies,  northern  Australia,  the 
Philippines,  China,  southern  Japan, 
Guam  and  South  Pacific  Islands. 
Reported also from Galapagos Islands 
and Gulf of California.

LIVE 

(photo by: G. Edgar)

PROCESSED 

(photo by: J. Akamine)

54


Holothuria fuscogilva 


Cherbonnier, 1980

COMMON  NAMES:


  White  teatfish  (

FAO

),  White  mammyfish  (India),  Holothurie  blanche 
à  mamelles  (

FAO

),  Kal  attai  (India),  Bawny  white  (Egypt),  Pauni  myeupe  (Zanzibar, Tanzania), 
Benono (Madagascar), Le Tété blanc (New Caledonia),  Susuan (Philippines), Huhuvalu hinehina 
(Tonga), Temaimamma (Kiribati), Sucuwalu (Fiji).

DIAGNOSTIC  FEATURES:


  Colour 
variable,  from  completely  dark  brown,  to 
dark  grey  with  whitish  spots,  or  whitish 
or  beige  with  dark  brown  blotches.  In  the 
Western Indian Ocean, it tends to be reddish-
brown dorsally and white ventrally and the 
anus is yellow. Ventral surface is greyish to 
brown. Body is suboval, strongly flattened ventrally, stout and quite firm with a thick body wall, and 
presents characteristic large lateral protrusions (‘teats’) at the ventral margins. Podia on the dorsal 
surface are sparse and small, but these are numerous on the ventral surface. The tegument is usually 
covered by fine sand. Mouth is ventral with 20 stout grey tentacles. Anus surrounded by inconspicuous 
teeth. No Cuvierian tubules. Juveniles are yellowish-green or yellow, with black blotches.

Ossicles:


 Tentacles with stout rods, up to 700 µm long, rugose distally. Dorsal body wall with 
tables and ellipsoid buttons. Table disc roundish and undulating, 65–100 µm across, perforated by 
10–15 holes, low spire ending in a stout crown of spines that can have more than one layer in the 
largest tables. Ellipsoid buttons irregular, some 65 µm long. Ventral body wall with similar tables and 
ellipsoid buttons as those dorsally, and, in addition, slightly knobbed buttons, 60–80 µm long. Ventral 
and dorsal podia with large perforated plates.

Processed  appearance:


  Flat  and  stout 
shape with obvious teats along sides. Surface 
smooth  to  slightly  wrinkled  and  powdery. 
Entire  body  different  shades  of  grey-brown. 
One single cut dorsally but not completely to 
the mouth or anus. Common size 18–24 cm.

Remarks: 


Uthicke, O’Hara and Byrne (2004) 
give this species a wide Indo-Pacific distribution 
and  separate  it  from  Holothuria  whitmaei. 
The ventral surface is light grey or brownish, 
whereas  it  is  dark  grey  in  H.  whitmaei.  The 
lateral  ‘teats’  may  appear  longer  and  thinner 
than in most individuals of H. whitmaei.

Size: 


Maximum  length  about  57  cm. Average 
fresh weight from 2 400 g (Madagascar, India and 
Papua New Guinea) to 3 000 g (Egypt); average 
fresh length from 40 cm (India and Madagascar), 
42 cm (Papua New Guinea) to 60 cm (Egypt). 
In  New  Caledonia,  average  live  weight  about 
2 440 g and average live length about 28 cm.

HABITAT  AND  BIOLOGY:


  Commonly 
inhabits  outer  barrier  reef  slopes,  reef  passes 
(after Cherbonnier, 1980)

table of ventral body 


wall


plate of 


podia


large tables of dorsal body wall


rod of 


tentacles


ellipsoids of 


ventral body 


wall


ellipsoids of 


dorsal body 


wall


calcareous ring


button of ventral 


body wall


perforated plate 


of podia



Aspidochirotida: Holothuriidae


55


and  sandy  areas  in  semi-sheltered  reef 
habitats in 10 to 50 m water depth. Can also 
be found in seagrass beds (Papua New Guinea 
and India) between 0 and 40 m. In Fiji, this 
species recruits in shallow seagrass beds and 
then moves to deeper zones.
It attains size-at-maturity at 1 100 g. In New 
Caledonia,  this  species  reproduces  between 
November  and  January,  while  in  Solomon 
Islands between August and October. 

EXPLOITATION:


Fisheries:


  Harvested  in  artisanal  (e.g. 
the  Philippines,  Tonga,  and  Madagascar), 
semi-industrial (New Caledonia) and industrial 
fisheries  (Australia,  Egypt)  throughout  its 
range  in  the  Indo-Pacific,  and  is  among  the 
most  valuable  species.  Harvested  by  hand 
collecting,  free  diving  and  lead-bombs  and 
by SCUBA diving (Madagascar) and hookah 
(Australia). In many fisheries H. fuscogilva has been overexploited. In the Africa and Indian Ocean 
region, it is fished in the Comoros, Mozambique, Kenya, Madagascar and Seychelles. In Seychelles, it 
is considered fully exploited.

Regulations:


 Before a moratorium in Papua New Guinea, regulations included a minimum size 
limit (35 cm live and 15 cm dry). On the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, there is an overall TAC of 
89 tonnes y
-1
, which is reviewed periodically. In other fisheries in Australia, a size limit of 32 cm is 
imposed. In New Caledonia, the minimum size limit is 35 cm for live animals and 16 cm dried, and 
harvesting using compressed air is prohibited. In Maldives, there is a ban on the use of SCUBA to 
protect the stocks of this species.

Human consumption: 


Mostly, the reconstituted body wall (bêche-de-mer) is consumed by Asians 
and is highly regarded.

Main market and value:


 It is a high-value species. In Papua New Guinea, it was previously sold 
at USD17–33 kg
-1
 dried. It has been traded recently at USD42–88 kg
-1
 dried in the Philippines. In 
New Caledonia, this species is exported for USD40–80 kg
-1
 dried and fishers may receive USD7 kg
-1
 
wet weight. In Fiji, fishers receive USD30–55 per piece fresh. Prices in Hong Kong China SAR retail 
markets ranged from USD128 to 274 kg
-1
. Prices in Guangzhou wholesale markets ranged from USD25 
to 165 kg
-1
 dried.

GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION: 


From Madagascar and the Red Sea in 
the west, across to Easter Island in the 
east and from southern China to south to 
Lord Howe Island. Occurs throughout 
much of the western central Pacific as 
far east as French Polynesia.

LIVE 

(photo by: S.W. Purcell)

PROCESSED 

(photo by: S.W. Purcell)

56


Holothuria fuscopunctata 


Jaeger, 1833

COMMON  NAMES:


 Elephant trunkfish (

FAO

), Holothurie trompe d’éléphant (

FAO

), Betaretry 
(Madagascar), Barangu mwamba (Zanzibar, Tanzania), Sapatos (Philippines), Ngoma (Kenya), Kunyi 
(Indonesia),  L’éléphant  (New  Caledonia),  Terebanti  (Kiribati),  Elefanite  (Tonga),  Dairo-ni-cakao 
(Fiji).

DIAGNOSTIC  FEATURES:


  Coloration 
varies  a  little  from  golden  to  light  brown 
or  creamy  dorsally  with  numerous  brown 
spots (around papillae), shading to whitish 
ventrally.  This  species  has  characteristic 
deep, brown wrinkles dorsally (like part of 
an elephant’s trunk). Body is suboval, arched 
dorsally and strongly flattened ventrally. A 
large  species  with  a  stout  body  and  thick 
body  wall.  The  body  is  often  covered  by 
fine sediment. Mouth ventral with 20 stout, 
brown,  tentacles. Anus  is  large  and  black, 
has  no  teeth,  and  is  surrounded  by  five 
groups of papillae. No Cuvierian tubules. 

Ossicles:


 Tentacles with straight rods, 30–150 µm long, slightly spiny. Dorsal and ventral body wall 
with numerous tables and ellipsoid buttons, with ventrally also some smooth and knobbed buttons. 
Tables have small discs, 35–55 µm across, with irregular and spiny rim, perforated by 4 central and 
few peripheral holes, and a low spire that ends in a spiny crown. Ellipsoid buttons perforated by 
4–6 pairs of holes, on average 75 µm long. Dorsal and ventral podia with spiny plates which can take 
the form of irregular branching rods.

Processed appearance:


 Processed animals are relatively elongate, arched dorsally, flattened 
ventrally.  Light  brown  to  beige  dorsally 
with  deep  grooves.  Ventral  surface  is 
smoother.  Tiny  black  spots  are  noticeable 
over  whole  body.  Small  cut  across  mouth 
or one single long cut ventrally. Common 
dried size 20–25 cm. 

Remarks:


 Cherbonnier (1980) considered 
Holothuria  axiologa  Clark,  1921  a  junior 
synonym.  The  body  fluid  is  bright  yellow 
and stains, making this species undesirable 
to harvest and gut. 

Size:


  Maximum  length  about  70  cm; 
average length about 48 cm. Average adult 
weight 3 kg; maximum 5.5 kg.
(after Cherbonnier, 1980)

tables of body wall


calcareous 


ring


buttons of dorsal body 


wall


little plate of podia


buttons of ventral 


body wall


rod of dorsal podia


rods of 


tentacles



Aspidochirotida: Holothuriidae


57


HABITAT AND BIOLOGY:


 
H.  fuscopunctata  lives  in  shallow  waters, 
generally  from  3  to  25  m  depth.  Inhabits 
reef slopes, lagoons and seagrass beds over 
sandy  bottoms.  Generally  found  on  coarse 
sand or coral rubble. 
It attains size-at-maturity at 1 200 g. On the 
Great Barrier Reef (Australia), this species 
reproduces annually in December, while in 
New Caledonia from December to February.

EXPLOITATION:


Fisheries:


  This  species  is  mostly  fished 
artisanally.  Harvested  mostly  by  hand 
collecting  by  free-diving.  Also  collected 
using lead-bombs (e.g. Papua New Guinea) 
and  SCUBA  diving  (Madagascar).  In  the 
western  Pacific  region,  it  is  commercially 
exploited in most localities, east to Tonga. 
Previously harvested in Papua New Guinea, 
Solomon Islands and Vanuatu before a general moratorium. Harvesting is minimal in New Caledonia, 
Coral Sea and Torres Strait (Australia). In Tuvalu, it comprises 8% of the total catches. In Seychelles, 
this species is currently underexploited.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


in-praise-of-folly---shif-5.html

in-praise-of-folly---shif.html

in-pressath-steppt-das.html

in-production-at-pdc.html

in-regards-to-my-legal.html